estimate the error in approximating e by the fifth-degree polynomial Bluff Springs Illinois

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estimate the error in approximating e by the fifth-degree polynomial Bluff Springs, Illinois

Find the third degree Taylor polynomial, P_3(x), for f(x) = cos x about x = 0 and use it to calculate an approximate value for cos(pi/g). Show transcribed image text Approximations and Errors with Taylor Polynomials: Recall the work that you did in CAI.4 in calculating Taylor polynomials for functions, f(x), about x = 0 and about What is the (n+1)th derivative of our error function. Let's think about what happens when we take the (n+1)th derivative.

Now let's think about when we take a derivative beyond that. Use your answer in (b) to write an approximation for e^1.5 in sigma notation (and evaluate using Mathematica). for some z in [0,x]. So our polynomial, our Taylor Polynomial approximation, would look something like this; So I'll call it p of x, and sometimes you might see a subscript of big N there to

If you take the first derivative of this whole mess, and this is actually why Taylor Polynomials are so useful, is that up to and including the degree of the polynomial, Your cache administrator is webmaster. So what that tells us is that we could keep doing this with the error function all the way to the nth derivative of the error function evaluated at "a" is This is going to be equal to zero.

Consider the function g(x) = e^2x. Now let's think about something else. Consider the function f(x) = cos x. The distance between the two functions is zero there.

Question: Approximations and Errors with Taylor Polynomials:... The n+1th derivative of our nth degree polynomial. I'll try my best to show what it might look like. The system returned: (22) Invalid argument The remote host or network may be down.

Generated Sat, 15 Oct 2016 06:44:38 GMT by s_ac15 (squid/3.5.20) ERROR The requested URL could not be retrieved The following error was encountered while trying to retrieve the URL: http://0.0.0.9/ Connection That's going to be the derivative of our function at "a" minus the first deriviative of our polynomial at "a". Your cache administrator is webmaster. So, f of be there, the polynomial is right over there, so it will be this distance right over here.

Chegg Chegg Chegg Chegg Chegg Chegg Chegg BOOKS Rent / Buy books Sell books My books STUDY Textbook solutions Expert Q&A TUTORS TEST PREP ACT prep ACT pricing SAT prep SAT Your cache administrator is webmaster. Generated Sat, 15 Oct 2016 06:44:38 GMT by s_ac15 (squid/3.5.20) Expert Answer Get this answer with Chegg Study View this answer OR Find your book Find your book Need an extra hand?

It will help us bound it eventually, so let me write that. Calculate the error associated with your approximation. Taylor Polynomials as Partial Sums: a. The system returned: (22) Invalid argument The remote host or network may be down.

The system returned: (22) Invalid argument The remote host or network may be down. some people will call this a remainder function for an nth degree polynomial centered at "a", sometimes you'll see this as an "error" function, but the "error" function is sometimes avoided Instead, use Taylor polynomials to find a numerical approximation. Once again, I could write an n here, I could write an a here to show it's an nth degree centered at "a".

And then plus go to the third derivative of f at a times x minus a to the third power, (I think you see where this is going) over three factorial, Note that the inequality comes from the fact that f^(6)(x) is increasing, and 0 <= z <= x <= 1/2 for all x in [0,1/2]. So, *** Error Below: it should be 6331/3840 instead of 6331/46080 *** since exp(x) is an increasing function, 0 <= z <= x <= 1/2, and . What is this thing equal to, or how should you think about this.

Actually I'll write that right now... The square root of e sin(0.1) The integral, from 0 to 1/2, of exp(x^2) dx We cannot find the value of exp(x) directly, except for a very few values of x. So let me write that. What we can continue in the next video, is figure out, at least can we bound this, and if we're able to bound this, if we're able to figure out an

and maybe f of x looks something like that... So if you measure the error at a, it would actually be zero, because the polynomial and the function are the same there. Use your answer in (b) to write an approximation for e^1.5 in sigma notation (and evaluate using Mathematica). In general, if you take an n+1th derivative, of an nth degree polynomial, and you can prove it for yourself, you can even prove it generally, but I think it might

that's my y axis, and that's my x axis... The sum that your wrote in (c) is actually a 6^th partial sum approximation for e^1.5. Let's think about what the derivative of the error function evaluated at "a" is. So, for x=0.1, with an error of at most , or sin(0.1) = 0.09983341666...

if we can actually bound it, maybe we can do a bit of calculus, we can keep integrating it, and maybe we can go back to the original function, and maybe e. Similarly, you can find values of trigonometric functions. Expert Answer Get this answer with Chegg Study View this answer OR Find your book Find your book Need an extra hand?

Skip to main contentSubjectsMath by subjectEarly mathArithmeticAlgebraGeometryTrigonometryStatistics & probabilityCalculusDifferential equationsLinear algebraMath for fun and gloryMath by gradeK–2nd3rd4th5th6th7th8thHigh schoolScience & engineeringPhysicsChemistryOrganic ChemistryBiologyHealth & medicineElectrical engineeringCosmology & astronomyComputingComputer programmingComputer scienceHour of CodeComputer animationArts So because we know that p prime of a is equal to f prime of a when we evaluate the error function, the derivative of the error function at "a" that Here is a list of the three examples used here, if you wish to jump straight into one of them. Since |cos(z)| <= 1, the remainder term can be bounded.

And this general property right over here, is true up to and including n. Over 6 million trees planted Chegg Chegg Chegg Chegg Chegg Chegg Chegg BOOKS Rent / Buy books Sell books My books STUDY Textbook solutions Expert Q&A TUTORS TEST PREP ACT prep The system returned: (22) Invalid argument The remote host or network may be down. So this is going to be equal to zero , and we see that right over here.