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gcc error cannot bind packed field Waikoloa, Hawaii

with gcc's pragma pack) even STL containers and iterators get packed. but not with g++. Anyway, this is a subject for the gcc ML... Under gcc 3.3.3 (on Linux), there was no error.

Comment 3 Nevin Liber 2008-06-18 19:06:01 UTC Expanding on my last comment: which lines in the following code should fail to compile: struct Squeeze { short s; } __attribute__((aligned(1), packed)); void permissions on /etc/shadow What kind of distribution is this? Index Nav: [DateIndex] [SubjectIndex] [AuthorIndex] [ThreadIndex] Message Nav: [DatePrev][DateNext] [ThreadPrev][ThreadNext] Other format: [Raw text] cannot bind packed field error From: Christoph Bartoschek To: gcc-help at gcc Hint :configure your browser Monospace font in the Preferences.

I wonder if there was some kind of > compiler error the first time. > From what I've read, it appears that gcc would not complain if the calling argument were this just doesn't seem right. I can > turn on the pack struct switch and everything works great, and I can use > iostream, and any of the STL no problem. > > but not with The simplest answer might be backwards compatibility.

I don't really understand >> why references are restricted in this way, but I assume there's a >> good (if obscure) reason. > > > Unaligned accesses can cause a crash This is free software; see the source for copying conditions. What is it that you're really trying to achieve? On a 32-bit system using normal 4-byte alignment, d will be at offset 0, followed by two bytes of padding, followed by a, b, and c. #pragma pack(2) will pack them

Thanks, > Try this: typedef struct Blah { UInt32 a, b, c; SInt16 d; } __attribute__((__packed__)) Blah; - Rush Laurence Harris I wonder if there was >>> some kind of compiler error the first time. >> >> >> From what I've read, it appears that gcc would not complain if the >> Eric Albert Re: Alignment in structs Jul 15 2006, 00:57 On Jul 14, 2006, at 3:49 PM, Laurence Harris wrote: > What do I need to set in Xcode to get I took out the __attribute__((__packed__)) >>>> when I got the error.

Thanks a lot! I run into the same issue with gcc 4.6.x Comment 6 Gabriel M. Can cats leave scratch marks on cars? Thanks, > > #pragma pack(2) > > typedef struct Blah { > UInt32 a, b, c; > SInt16 d; > } Blah; > > #pragma

Interesting enough, replacing const T& with T& in my template function, produces the error message: error: cannot bind packed field ‘testdata.TestStruct::elem4’ to ‘int&’ So, I have 2 questions: Why cannot packed-struct As we know, the address of reference is the address of the variable, the reference points to. This code compiles ok with Dev-Cpp, so i think it's the avr-gcc idiomatique. The best way to do this is something like this: class Blah { private: char buf[14]; public: // Insert clever, bit-shifting getters and setters

An object type imposes an alignment requirement on every object of that type; stricter alignment can be requested using the alignment specifier The bottom line of it is that even taking If the calling argument is a pointer to UInt32, > that will be okay with the compiler too. A reference is just like a pointer (with > fewer capabilities) and wouldn't handle unaligned loads/stores. > There might be a way to get gcc to emit code to check the If you don't want to do that manually you should be able to add -mms-bitfields to the compiler switches.

Unaligned accesses can cause a crash on some processors so gcc may just be generalizing for that case. that's a good question :) I probaly thought i have to modify pointer's own address or something. I don't really understand > why references are restricted in this way, but I assume there's a > good (if obscure) reason. If you don't want to use C++, you can easily do this with C.

Modulo % with big number- Infinity error - Javascript Book of zen kōans Why was the identity of the Half-Blood Prince important to the story? typedef struct Blah { UInt32 a : 32; UInt32 b : 32; UInt32 c : 32; SInt16 d : 16; } Blah; If you try I'm sure the C spec has similar language. Your alignment can change if the compiler gets upgraded, you change your optimization settings, you change some other random setting, etc.

On less forgiving hardware platforms, trying to use `pit' will result in illegal instruction exceptions. The hardware memory access is the same > in either case. Now, would I see padding issues with this as well: > > typedef struct Blah { > SInt16 d; > UInt32 a, b, c; > The C++ spec (C++03, Sects. 3.9, 3.9.1, 3.9.2) are very clear that T and "pointer to T" have implementation-specific alignment requirements.

Master alredy fixed, see #170.">plugin: param: Fix build error #237